What We Do

USHRN serves as a facilitator and a catalyst to build and expand the base of the domestic human rights movement, supporting the growth of an active, multi-sector movement – one that utilizes the human rights frame to identify the root causes of violations and to call on government to address the realities on the ground.  

Currently USHRN is made up of more than 300 member and partner organizations working on multiple human rights issues. USHRN remains an anchor of the domestic rights movement and supports a bold, broad-based people-centered human rights movement—one that is led by people most directly impacted by rights violations; comprised primarily of grassroots and community based groups and individuals working collectively and across issue areas; and highlights the human rights concerns of the least popular and most overlooked groups in our society including people living in or near poverty, people caught up in the system of mass incarceration, undocumented immigrants, poor single mothers, persons with disabilities, and indigenous peoples. 

USHRN places priority on elevating and amplifying the voices of those who are marginalized and vulnerable, and whose voices are most often ignored. Our work is guided by the following core principles:

  • Human rights are universal, interdependent, indivisible, and inalienable.
  • Human rights movements must be led by those most directly affected by human rights violations.
  • Human rights advocacy and organizing should prioritize the struggles of the poor and most marginalized groups in society.
  • Human rights movements must be inclusive and respect and reflect the diversity within communities.
  • Human rights encompass civil, political, economic, social, cultural, environmental, sexual, and development rights for individuals, Peoples, and groups.

Read our Strategic Statement: 2013 - 2015 to learn more about work and our strategies for advancing human rights in the U.S.

Related Information

History of USHRN

USHRN was formed in 2003 after a series of meetings involving more than sixty of the most prominent and influential human rights and social justice activists in the United States...
More about History of USHRN »»